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All BSU Classes Have Moved Online

The Spring session of Bridgewater State University’s Senior College scheduled to start on Monday, March 16, 2020, has been postponed due to conditions stemming from the Coronavirus (COVID-19). If you have already registered your registration remains in place and we will be in touch with you soon regarding our plan for rescheduling the start of this Spring session. We hope to keep the entire course offerings intact, although we appreciate that schedule conflicts may require changes. Please check your email or check back here for more information.

BSU Senior College

BSU Senior College: lifelong learning for mature adults

senior college photo

 

Important Notice regarding Senior College:

The Spring session of Bridgewater State University’s Senior College scheduled to start on Monday, March 16, 2020, has been postponed due to conditions stemming from the Coronavirus (COVID-19). If you have already registered your registration remains in place and we will be in touch with you soon regarding our plan for rescheduling the start of this Spring session. We hope to keep the entire course offerings intact, although we appreciate that schedule conflicts may require changes. Please check your email or check back here for more information.

 

Keep Learning! Keep Growing!

Bridgewater State University’s new Senior College offers intellectually stimulating seminars and courses for mature learners (50+). Our six-week courses foster creativity, self-discovery and peer education.

Affordable

Participants select up to 3 courses per semester for only $55.00 per person, per semester.

Led by Experts 

Courses led by BSU emeritus faculty, full and part-time faculty, and other distinguished educators in the sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities. Senior College is where adults can enjoy learning in a relaxed community of peers among leading scholars and experts who share their interests in exploring both current and historical topics and traditional disciplines. Our members come from all walks of life and bring diverse backgrounds to the classroom setting.

We're Growing: We've added more courses and a new location, BSU Attleboro, for 2020.

Spring 2020 Courses

Bridgewater

Location: Bridgewater Public Library, 15 South Street, Bridgewater, MA

Parking is located behind the library and the facility is handicapped accessible.

Session I (March 16 to April 27)

Mondays 9-10:20 am, Kathryn Evans, Writing Your Life: Discovering the Story of Your Life's Journey

Mondays 10:40 am-Noon, Mike Kryzanek, U.S. Foreign Policy in Challenging Times

Wednesdays Noon-1:20 pm, Ellen Scheible, Reading James Joyce: Dubliners

Wednesdays 1:40-3:00 pm, Calvin Mires, Massachusetts Maritime Heritage & Archaeology

Thursdays Noon-1:20 pm, Cynthia Ricciardi, Discovering Your Roots: An Introduction to Genealogy

Thursdays 1:40-3:00 pm, John Winters, African American Literature

Session II (May 4 to June 15)

Mondays 10:40 am-Noon, Pamela Hayes-Bohanan, Media Literacy: Fake News, Misinformation, Scams, and Frauds

Wednesdays Noon-1:20 pm, Deb Stringham, Dance, Movies, and Society

Wednesdays 1:40-3:00 pm, Kathryn Evans, Writing Your Life: Discovering the Story of Your Life's Journey

Thursdays Noon-1:20 pm, Cynthia Ricciardi, Discovering Your Roots: An Introduction to Genealogy

Thursdays 1:40-3:00 pm, David Moore, History & Future of Town Government in Bridgewater

BSU Attleboro

Location: BSU Attleboro, 11 Field Road, Attleboro, MA

Session I (March 16 to April 27)

Tuesdays 9-10:20 am, Nan Loggains, Election 2020

Tuesdays 10:40 am-Noon, Frank Cook, Final Year: The Western Front in Europe, 1944-45

Session II (May 4 to June 15)

Tuesdays 9-10:20 am, Nan Loggains, The American Home Front During World War II

Tuesdays 10:40 am-Noon, Frank Cook, Egypt: Gift of the Nile

Register Today

Contact information:

Jennifer Reid, Director, College of Continuing Studies
email: BSUseniorcollege@bridgew.edu
508.531.2570

Bridgewater State University
Moakley Center
100 Burrill Ave, Room 211
Bridgewater, MA 02325

 

Course Descriptions

Bridgewater

Location: Bridgewater Public Library, 15 South Street, Bridgewater, MA

Session I (March 16 to April 27)

Mondays 9-10:20 am, Kathryn Evans, Writing Your Life: Discovering the Story of Your Life's Journey
Participants will craft a narrative describing a memory, making it come to life—with feedback from the instructor and classmates—so that it might be shared with children and grandchildren.

Mondays 10:40 am-Noon, Mike Kryzanek, U.S. Foreign Policy in Challenging Times
United States Foreign Policy in Challenging Times will provide an overview of many of the key global and regional interactions that face the United States in the modern era. The goal of the course will be to examine how the United States foreign policy establishment—White House, Congress, State Department, the intelligence community, and numerous lobbying organizations — responds to various concerns and crises in the international arena and seeks to advance American interests.

Wednesdays Noon-1:20 pm, Ellen Scheible, Reading James Joyce: Dubliners
James Joyce wrote some of the most revered but complicated fiction of the early twentieth century. An Irish writer who lived as an expat in Europe for most of his adult life, Joyce infused controversy into much of his work by openly critiquing what he saw as a stagnant modernity in Irish culture. Join us as we read a handful of short stories from Joyce's collection, Dubliners.

Wednesdays 1:40-3:00 pm, Calvin Mires, Massachusetts Maritime Heritage & Archaeology
Join Dr. Mires in lectures, discussions, and hands-on activities that focus on better understanding the essential role maritime heritage played in shaping and defining culture and identity for the state, and the tangible remains of this heritage that exist in archaeological resources, such as shipwrecks and maritime culture landscapes.

Thursdays Noon-1:20 pm, Cynthia Ricciardi, Discovering Your Roots: An Introduction to Genealogy
Participants in this introductory/intermediate genealogy session will learn how to climb into their family trees: how and where to research, how to evaluate and interpret what they find, and how to focus and organize their results.

Thursdays 1:40-3:00 pm, John Winters, African American Literature
Students will survey writings in African American literature, from slave narratives to the novels of Toni Morrison and beyond. Studying distinguished writers of poetry, drama, essays, narratives and prose fiction, students will attend to the historical, cultural and political contexts in which the works were produced.

Session II (May 4 to June 15)

Mondays 10:40 am-Noon, Pamela Hayes-Bohanan, Media Literacy: Fake News, Misinformation, Scams, and Frauds
According to a recent Pew Study, “Many Americans Say Made-Up News Is a Critical Problem That Needs To Be Fixed” most Americans think that made-up news is a major problem and that it impacts our confidence in the government and in each other. A further study, “The Ability to Classify Statements as Factual or Opinion Varies Widely Based on Political Awareness, Digital Savviness and Trust in News Media” reveals that as people age their ability to distinguish fact from opinion diminishes. Participants in this course will be provided strategies and intellectual tools to help them identify false information, and information bias, and to recognize when data is being misused.

Wednesdays Noon-1:20 pm, Deb Stringham, Dance, Movies, and Society
Dance is a powerful expression of the human spirit, communicating and bringing people together, which is why we find movies about dance to be not only entertaining, but deeply compelling. Dance films tell stories that uncover our passions, hopes, dreams and connections to one another. They portray universal themes such as love, courage and overcoming adversity, while highlighting important social issues such as gender, race and class. In this course we will use dance movies as a lens through which we can view and better understand who we are: our feelings, beliefs, values and humanity, as individuals and as a society.

Wednesdays 1:40-3:00 pm, Kathryn Evans, Writing Your Life: Discovering the Story of Your Life's Journey
Participants will craft a narrative describing a memory, making it come to life—with feedback from the instructor and classmates—so that it might be shared with children and grandchildren.

Thursdays Noon-1:20 pm, Cynthia Ricciardi, Discovering Your Roots: An Introduction to Genealogy
Participants in this introductory/intermediate genealogy session will learn how to climb into their family trees: how and where to research, how to evaluate and interpret what they find, and how to focus and organize their results. Using lectures/presentations, hands-on activities, discussion, and online as well as local resources, the instructor will introduce participants to the elements of 21st-century genealogical research.

Thursdays 1:40-3:00 pm, David Moore, History & Future of Town Government in Bridgewater
This course will focus on the evolution of the town government in Bridgewater over the last 30 years and the changes that have taken place. The various changes from a three-member board of selectmen, to one with a town administrator, to a five-member board and then to a town council with a strong town manager, is it better or worse? Would a council /mayor be better? “Good old boys” or “home team”? Representative town meeting?

BSU Attleboro

Location: BSU Attleboro, 11 Field Road, Attleboro, MA

Session I (March 16 to April 27)

Tuesdays 9-10:20 am, Nan Loggains, Election 2020
This course is a six-week study of the 2020 election year. The course will consider the issues confronting American society and how they relate to the upcoming election.

Tuesdays 10:40 am-Noon, Frank Cook, Final Year: The Western Front in Europe, 1944-45
May 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the conclusion of World War II in Europe. The focus of this course is on the critical events on the western front in the final year of the European war that lead to the defeat of Nazism. 1944 witnessed D-Day, the breakout from Normandy, the liberation of Paris, the failure of the planned thrust through Holland with its hope of a quick end to hostilities, and the German counteroffensive that became the Battle of the Bulge.

Session II (May 4 to June 15)

Tuesdays 9-10:20 am, Nan Loggains, The American Home Front During World War II
This course is a six-week study of life on the American home front during World War II. The course will consider the issues and events facing American society during the war years. Topics covered include the draft, women’s roles, bond drives, rationing, migration, wartime boom towns, and rationing. In addition, the course will examine American culture during the period.

Tuesdays 10:40 am-Noon, Frank Cook, Egypt: Gift of the Nile
One of the most interesting and enduring civilizations of ancient history is Egypt. The Father of History, Herodotus, identified the Egyptian civilization as “the gift of the Nile.” Through lectures, discussion, and activities, illustrated with pictures taken by the presenter while studying archaeology in the Middle East, participants will travel back in time to visit this mysterious, fascinating society of the past.