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Past Events

 

Unlearning Racism—Becoming an Active Racial Justice Ally

May 18 and June 1, 15, 29, 2021 | All from 1-3 p.m. (4 Tuesdays)

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity

This 4-session training will provide you additional tools for becoming active anti-racist allies and a supportive environment in which to practice these strategies.

Contact: Luis Paredes, Director, Office of Institutional Diversity

 

Reflective Dialogue

Monday, May 17, 2021

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity

Open to all community members to learn about and discuss issues critical to cultural humility, equity, diversity, and inclusion. With this series, the Office of Institutional Diversity (OID) strives toward building more robust and organic relationships through increased understanding and trust, which ultimately nurtures an inclusive workplace. Bring your candor, your experiences, and your willingness to continue creating a welcoming BSU for all.

Contact: Luis Paredes, Director, Office of Institutional Diversity

 

Empowered Bystander Training

Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity

The Empowered Bystander Training is designed to provide the BSU community with tools and competencies to take action when witnessing acts of bias and prejudice. An Empowered Bystander is someone who sees behaviors in themselves or others that exhibit bias or prejudice, and who takes action/intervenes to address them.
Participants in this training will:

  • Explore socialization through a Racial Justice and Equity lens to acknowledge bias and prejudice;
  • Learn ways to interrupt biased or prejudicial thoughts and behaviors;
  • Practice selecting and implementing a variety of instances of bias and prejudice to determine the best response.

Contact: Luis Paredes, Director, Office of Institutional Diversity 

 

Asian Americans: History, Memories, and Social Justice (2 Part Series) Discussions of the past, present and future of the Asian American community in Massachusetts

May 10 and May 24, 2021 | Both from 6-7:30 p.m.

Sponsored by Bridgewater State University, Bridgewater Council on Aging/Cole-Yeaton Senior Center, and Bridgewater Communities for Civil Rights

Part I: Asian immigration over the past 200 years: Monday, May 10, 6-7:30 pm
Opening Remarks: Tackey Chan, State Representative, 2nd Suffolk District
Speakers:

  • Wing-kai To,  Ph.D. Assistant Provost for Global Engagement and Professor of History, Bridgewater State University (Author of Chinese in Boston, 1870-1965)
  • Jean Wu, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus in American Studies, Tufts University (2019 Asian American Commission Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient, Co-Editor of Asian American Studies Now: A Critical Reader)

Part II: How has the world changed? Oral history told by older Asian Americans: Monday, May 24, 6-7:30 pm
Speakers:

  • Stephanie Fan, Retired educator, community leader, and consultant (Organizer of the group Greater Boston Asian American Seniors for Peace and Justice)
  • Michael Liu, Ph.D., Research Fellow, Institute of Asian American Studies, UMass Boston.  (Author of Forever Struggle: Activism, Identity and Survival in Boston's Chinatown)

 

Community Listening Session Part II: Bridgewater Raynham Lived Experiences

Wednesday, May 5, 2021 | 4-5:30 p.m. (4 Tuesdays)

Sponsored by Bridgewater Communities for Civil Rights (BCCR) and Diversity and Inclusion for Community Empowerment (DICE)

Over the past two months, BCCR (Bridgewater Communities for Civil Rights) and DICE (Diversity and Inclusion for Community Empowerment) partnered with two professors Dr. Jibril Solomon and Dr. Taylor Hall, from Bridgewater State University’s School of Social Work.

Efforts were made to analyze and summarize the data results from the surveys completed by the Bridgewater and Raynham community. Findings were then turned into an official report, along with a PowerPoint presentation to explain the results and set the stage for future actions in the quest for greater equity and inclusion in our communities.

A commitment to sharing the eye-opening findings with Bridgewater and Raynham town officials, BRRSD Administrators, and all community members who are seeking protection and or support change for the greater good was expressed.

Participants were invited to join on May 5th at 4:00-5:30 for this virtual event to gain further insight into the lives of marginalized communities in Bridgewater and Raynham and explore possible solutions.

Event organizers expressed the importance of this presentation as the WHY and key drivers behind this collaborative project continue to grow with importance. In the wake of increasing numbers of national and local hate crimes, inclusive of systemic brutality against people of color, it behooves all Bridgewater and Raynham community residents to come together to figure out how to bring our own towns forward.

Participants were invited to continue the conversation that was started a few months ago and were encouraged to invite other leaders, town stakeholders, residents, and individuals who work in our towns to attend and become part of these efforts to build more inclusive and equitable Bridgewater and Raynham communities. 

 

Asian Americans: Film Series

Friday, April 30, and Thursday, May 6, 2021 | Both from 1-2:30 p.m.

Sponsored by the Minnock Institute for Global Engagement, Division of Student Success and Diversity, Martin Richard Institute for Social Justice, and Asian Studies Program.

Two episodes of a five-episode PBS series that casts a new lens on U.S. history and the ongoing role that Asian Americans have played in shaping the nation’s history. Episode 3: Good Americans was shown on April 30th, and Episode 5: Breaking Through was shown on May 6th. 

Told through individual lives and personal histories, the five-hour film series delivers “a bold, fresh perspective on a history that matters today, more than ever. As America becomes more diverse, and more divided, while facing unimaginable challenges, how do we move forward together? ...The series casts a new lens on U.S. history and the ongoing role that Asian Americans have played in shaping the nation's story."

At the turn of the new millennium, the national conversation turns to immigration, race, and economic disparity. As the U.S. becomes more diverse, yet more divided, a new generation of Asian Americans tackle the question, how do we as a nation move forward together?

Dr. Alice Cheng, Associate Professor of Psychology, and Dr. Yongjun Shin, Associate Professor of Communication Studies, will lead the discussion.

ASIAN AMERICANS is a production of WETA Washington, DC and the Center for Asian American Media (CAAM) for PBS, in association with the Independent Television Service (ITVS), Flash Cuts and Tajima-Peña Productions. 

The screenings/discussions were open to the BSU community and the public. 

 

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG) Action Week TEACH-IN

Thursday, April 29 - Wednesday, May 5, 2021 | 4-5 p.m.

FILMS that the Maxwell Library has streamed for the BSU Community. If you plan to use one for a specific class please let the library know with a simple email including class name and number (NYODER@bridgew.edu). 

Sisters Rising is the story of six Native American women fighting to restore personal and tribal sovereignty in the face of ongoing sexual violence against Indigenous women in the United States. Native American women are 2.5 times more likely to experience sexual assault than all other American women. 1 in 3 Native women report having been raped during her lifetime and 86% of the offenses are committed by non-Native men. These perpetrators exploit gaps in tribal jurisdictional authority and target Native women as 'safe victims' with near-impunity. Sisters rising is an urgent call to action, a gorgeous portrait of powerful women acting in solidarity, and a demand for tribal sovereignty and self-determination as the necessary step to ending violence against Native women.

Sisters Rising: https://tinyurl.com/4zhs4yxk 

Wind River A rookie FBI agent teams with a town's veteran game tracker with deep community ties and a haunted past to investigate the mysterious killing of a local girl on a remote Native American reservation.

Wind River: https://tinyurl.com/5xm8cmmf

RESOURCES:
“Indigenous Women Keep Going Missing in Montana”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ib0GDAPeymo 

“Running for MMIWG” Rosalie Fish TedTalk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8bFL7WC4iE 

The Search for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women—The Atlantic
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXZkdCaKSTA 

Our Sisters in Spirit
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zdzM6krfaKY 

We are more than murdered and missing. | Tamara Bernard | TEDxThunderBay 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fylLSRQ5kx8 

Secretary Haaland creates new unit for MMIW
https://www.doi.gov/news/secretary-haaland-creates-new-missing-murdered-unit-pursue-justice-missing-or-murdered-american?fbclid=IwAR1ycI9tvsTOrLgHsMvP52iliAd5nNyPqjA67eKDC7-Y745PI4UCumEf7Nc  

Contact: Joyce Rain Anderson, Coordinator Ethnic and Indigenous Studies

 

Civic Speaker Series: A Conversation with Suffolk County District Attorney Rachael Rollins

Thursday, April 22, 2021 | 4-5 p.m.

Hosted by the Martin Richard Institute for Social Justice. Sponsored by African American Studies Minor, and the Department of Criminal Justice.

District Attorney Rachael Rollins is the chief law enforcement officer for Boston, Chelsea, Revere, and Winthrop Massachusetts. She is the first woman ever elected as District Attorney in Suffolk County and the first woman of color ever elected to serve in this role in Massachusetts. Her story serves as an inspiration to those seeking to make a difference through public service.

Dr. Mia Ortiz, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at Bridgewater State University and Zahara Townsend, an undergraduate Justice Fellow with the MRISJ moderated the conversation including questions submitted prior to the event by the audience. Together with the DA, they discussed her experience running for office, and her impressive work as an advocate for criminal justice reform and racial equity through her position in public leadership.

Learn more about the leadership of DA Rollins here.

This was a free virtual event via Zoom. You may view the Conversation with Suffolk County District Attorney Rachael Rollins on YouTube.

 

Anti-Asian Violence and the Atlanta Spa Killings: Racism, Misogyny, Xenophobia and Colonialism in Asian America

Thursday, April 22, 2021 | 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.

Co-sponsored by: Minnock Institute for Global Engagement, Student Success and Diversity, Women’s and Gender Studies, Anthropology 

Introduction by Wing-kai To, Assistant Provost for Global Engagement, Bridgewater State University 
Panelists:  Miliann Kang, Associate Professor in Sociology and Asian American Studies, UMass Amherst and Genevieve Clutario, Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor in American Studies, Wellesley College
Moderated by Diana Fox, Professor of Anthropology, Bridgewater State University

Contact: Wing-kai To and Diana Fox

 

Empowered Bystander Training

Wednesday, April 21, 2021 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity

The Empowered Bystander Training is designed to provide the BSU community with tools and competencies to take action when witnessing acts of bias and prejudice. An Empowered Bystander is someone who sees behaviors in themselves or others that exhibit bias or prejudice, and who takes action/intervenes to address them.
Participants in this training will:

  • Explore socialization through a Racial Justice and Equity lens to acknowledge bias and prejudice;
  • Learn ways to interrupt biased or prejudicial thoughts and behaviors;
  • Practice selecting and implementing a variety of instances of bias and prejudice to determine the best response.

Contact: Luis Paredes, Director, Office of Institutional Diversity

 

Reflective Dialogue

Tuesday, April 13, 2021 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity

Open to all community members to learn about and discuss issues critical to cultural humility, equity, diversity, and inclusion. With this series, the Office of Institutional Diversity (OID) strives toward building more robust and organic relationships through increased understanding and trust, which ultimately nurtures an inclusive workplace. Bring your candor, your experiences, and your willingness to continue creating a welcoming BSU for all.

Contact: Luis Paredes, Director, Office of Institutional Diversity

 

Art & Racial Justice: The Region and the Nation

Monday, April 12, 2021 | 6-8 p.m.

Sponsored by Art History Program in the Department of Art & Art History

The BSU Art History Program in the Department of Art & Art History is pleased to invite you to our annual symposium. This year, our event explores the roles art and artists play in the pursuit of racial justice and equality both in our region and nationally. We have been able to assemble a wonderful group of 6 speakers to talk about the roles art and artists can play in pursuit of racial justice initiatives with a particular focus on our region. They include the Director of Education at the African American Museum in Boston and the Director of the Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists in Roxbury. 

Contact: Jonathan Shirland

 

Environmental Justice Webinar

Monday, April 12, 2021 | 3:20-4:35 p.m.

Sponsored by the Sustainability Program 

The Sustainability Program cordially invites you a Sustainability Month event, featuring: 

Deneen M. Simpson, Director of Environmental Justice at Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection: will discuss the 2017 EEA EJ Policy, EJ activities at MassDEP and community engagement/public involvement with EJ populations. 

Sara Wylie, PhD, is an Associate Professor Sociology/Anthropology and Health Science in Northeastern University’s Social Science Environmental Health Research Institute (SSEHRI). Dr. Wylie will discuss on enacting environmental data justice. Dr. Wylie will speak: Premature births, unexplained human and livestock sicknesses, flammable water faucets, toxic wells and the onset of hundreds of earthquakes, the impacts of fracking in the United States are far-reaching and deeply felt. In this talk Dr. Wylie explores how extractive resource systems, like natural gas extraction through fracking, are proceeded and supported by extractive data systems that create asymmetric access to information. Drawing together the fields of Environmental Justice and Data Justice, Wylie explores how we can build community centered information systems that help create accountability for corporations and state agencies. Based on her work building tools for community monitoring of the oil and gas industry and co-developing the watchdog organization the Environmental Data and Governance Initiative (EDGI) Dr. Wylie reflects on how we can create community centered research and data systems that move beyond mapping exposure disparities to address the drivers of toxic contamination and make corporations responsible for their environmental harms. This precious present moment of rebuilding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, provides an opportunity to jointly create sustainable and just systems. Now is the time, Wylie argues to organize and collectively theorize, develop, and enact environmental data justice. 

Contact: Inkyoung Kim

 

Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Social Justice in Africa: An Afternoon with the Mandela Washington Fellows, Part II

Friday, April 9, 2021 | 12-1:45 p.m.

Hosted by the BSU African Studies Program and the Minnock Center for Global Engagement, as part of Africa Week 2021.

Meet six amazing alumni from the prestigious Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders, discussing their careers in legal and development fields in Botswana, Ethiopia, Nigeria, and Uganda, and their contributions to advancing social justice in their countries. Learn more about BSU's work with the Mandela Washington Fellowship, and ask questions about connections between struggles for social justice in Africa and the United States.

Contact: Meghan Healy-Clancy, African Studies Program Coordinator

 

New England Conference for Multicultural Education

Friday, April 9, 2021 | 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

Co-sponsored by the National Association for Multicultural Education Region 1, Bridgewater State University, the Martin Richard Institute for Social Justice, Eastern Connecticut State University, and Fairfield University

“Living Multicultural Education - #BlackLivesMatter in the Classroom & Beyond”

Keynote – Why Black People Tend to Shout!: #BlackLivesMatter in the Classroom & Beyond,” by Dr. Earl Wright, II, Rhodes College 

Workshops:
-Finding & Evaluating Inclusive & Diverse Children's and Young Adult Literature
-Evaluating Racial Climate in an Academic Department
-Antiracism in Practice: Auditing Our Syllabi for Equity
-Preparing to Talk about Race & Racial Justice with Elementary Students
-Alternative Approaches to End the School-to-Prison Pipeline
-Implementing Antiracist Curriculum & Policies in a Public High School
-Using Digital Walks to Enhance Multicultural Understanding
-Creating a Culture of Conversations about Race in Schools

Contact: Melissa Winchell and Sarah Thomas, CEHS

 

A Dream Deferred: 50 Years of Blacks in Mathematics - Class of '42 Lecture Series

Thursday, April 8, 2021 | 4-5 p.m.

Sponsored by Academic Affairs

Keynote speaker Dr. Edray Herber Goins from Pomona College will give a talk entitled "A Dream Deferred: 50 years of Blacks in Mathematics.” Dr. Goins will walk us through the extraordinary contributions of several African and African American Mathematicians, including Dr. Walter Richard Talbot, the founder of National Association of Mathematicians (NMA). Dr. Goins is a well-known Mathematician whose work is in the field of number theory and algebriac geometry. He is also known for his incredible work in improving racial equity and promoting the success of underrepresented minorities in Mathematics.

Contact: Dean Kristen Porter-Utley

 

Voices Across the Border #3: Panel Discussion on Decolonization - “Decolonization: where we are and where we are going"

Thursday, April 8, 2020 | 1:30-2:50 p.m.

Sponsored by the Canadian Studies Program 

This is the third and final panel in the Voices Across the Border discussion series organized by Bridgewater State, Niagara, and Brock Universities this semester.

The panel is moderated by Brock University's Dr. Robyn Bourgeois and features our very own Dr. Joyce Rain Anderson (BSU English department and Director, Indigenous Studies Program).

In North America, decolonization is an essential part of reconciliation between non-Indigenous and Indigenous peoples. How do we reckon with the past and build a world where colonial ideologies are dismantled and Indigenous ways of knowing are valued and reinforced? This panel addresses three questions about the present and future of decolonization: Where are we? Where do we want to be? How do we get there? 

Contact: Andy Holman

 

Holocaust Day of Remembrance

Thursday, April 8, 2020 | 12-1:30 p.m.

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity, the Martin Richard Institute for Social Justice and the Department of Global Languages and Literatures.

On Thursday April 8, our campus came together for a special time of remembrance. We had the opportunity to hear testimony from an extraordinary woman, Alice Eichenbaum, who survived the Holocaust. She recounted her own story, and that of her late husband, sole survivor of Auschwitz within his family. Eichenbaum said she speaks about the Holocaust so “it should never happen again."

Guest Speaker:
Alice Eichenbaum, of Providence, survived the Holocaust in a ghetto near the Turkish border. Her late husband was a survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp, where his family perished.

This was a free virtual event via Zoom. View the Holocaust Day of Remembrance video on YouTube.

 

Social Justice, Law, and Development: An Afternoon with the Mandela Washington Young African Leaders, Part 1

Tuesday, April 6, 2021 | 12-1:45 p.m.

Hosted by the BSU African Studies Program and the Minnock Center for Global Engagement, as part of Africa Week 2021.

Meet six amazing alumni from the prestigious Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders, discussing their careers in legal and development fields in Botswana, Ethiopia, Nigeria, and Uganda, and their contributions to advancing social justice in their countries. Learn more about BSU's work with the Mandela Washington Fellowship, and ask questions about connections between struggles for social justice in Africa and the United States.

Contact: Meghan Healy-Clancy, African Studies Program Coordinator

 

Intersectionality in the Classroom and Beyond

Wednesday, March 31, 2021 | 12-1 p.m.

Facilitated by Diana Fox, Sheena Manuel, Michele Meek, and Cynthia Svoboda

 

Decolonization and Higher Education Forum

Tuesday, March 30, 2021 | 12:30-2 p.m.

Sponsored by Native American and Indigenous Studies, Martin Richard Institute for Social Justice, and MIGE Global Programs

At BSU, we have held several internal forums to address racial and social injustices, and we have established the President’s Racial Justice Task Force. However, there is concern about the ways in which decolonial pedagogies and decolonization are being applied (or not). This forum took a deeper look at colonial legacies and how intertwined the university is with colonial ideologies. We will not move far in our efforts for racial justice unless we are willing to untangle ourselves from these embedded practices. 

Speakers:

  • Dr. Leigh Patel, Professor of Educational Foundations, Organizations, and Policy at the University of Pittsburgh, also affiliated with Education for Liberation. 
  • Dr. Nitana Hicks Greendeer (Mashpee Wampanoag), teacher, researcher, and curriculum developer with Wôpanâak Language Reclamation Project and Head of School for the Wôpanâak Language immersion school, Weetumuw Katnuhtôhtakamuq
  • Linda Jeffers Coombs (Aquinnah Wampanoag), museum educator (Boston Children's Museum, Wampanoag Indigenous Program at Plimoth Plantation, and Aquinnah Cultural Center), interpreter, artisan, researcher, educator, writer, and more.

Contact: Joyce Rain Anderson, Jabbar Al-Obiadi

 

Unlearning Racism: Becoming a Racial Justice Ally Workshop Series (For Students)

4-part series: March 30, April 13 & 27, and May 11, 2021 (all Tuesdays) | 2-4 p.m.

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity

College-aged activists are leading the United States in our national work to become more racially just.  This four-session workshop series builds on your passion and skills as you help do racial justice work. We are engaging in honest reflective dialogue during the four workshops and exploring how we learned racial bias and ways we can help create racial equity and justice.  

Contact: Luis Paredes, Director, Office of Institutional Diversity

 

Aging & Social Justice: A Three-Part Zoom Series on Aging and Social Justice in Bridgewater as spoken by its older residents of color - Sheila & Paul Bracy, Doris Campbell, & Sherely Phillips

March 16, March 30, April 13, 2021 | 2-3:30 p.m.

Sponsored by Bridgewater Senior Center, Bridgewater Communities for Civil Rights, and Bridgewater State University

  • Part I Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 2:00pm - Oral history panel discussion with Bridgewater older residents of color, Moderator, Gloria Stanton, C.A.G.S.
  • Part II Tuesday, March 30, 2021, 2:00pm - Reflecting on the Civil Rights Movement, Moderator, Jeanne Oliver-Foster, MA
  • Part III Tuesday, April 13, 2021, 2:00pm - Mobilize & Call to Action for all ages Moderator, Sydné Marrow, M.Ed

Contact: Karen Aicher 

 

Homemade Citizenship: Black Success in the Face of White Violence

Thursday, March 25, 2021 | 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Co-sponsored by African American Studies, the Office of the Provost, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and the Martin Richard Institute for Social Justice

Dr. Koritha Mitchell’s talk demonstrated how African American culture has marched toward success rather than being driven by protect, as is commonly thought. In her talk drawn from her recent book From Slave Cabins to the White House, Dr. Mitchell explained how African Americans have consistently pursued achievement, crafting from scratch their sense of belonging in a hostile nation. Dr. Mitchell’s research into African American women’s literature and Michelle Obama’s public performance as First Lady shows how Black success and achievement have drawn violence rather than praise from white Americans.

Contact: Dr. Mia Ortiz, Interim Coordinator of African American Studies

 

Empowered Bystander Training

Thursday, March 25, 2021

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity

The Empowered Bystander Training was designed to provide the BSU community with tools and competencies to take action when witnessing acts of bias and prejudice.  An Empowered Bystander is someone who sees behaviors in themselves or others that exhibit bias or prejudice, and who takes action/intervenes to address them.

Participants in this training:

  • Explored socialization through a Racial Justice and Equity lens to acknowledge bias and prejudice; 
  • Learned ways to interrupt biased or prejudicial thoughts and behaviors;
  • Practiced selecting and implementing a variety of instances of bias and prejudice to determine the best response.

Contact: Luis Paredes, Director, Office of Institutional Diversity

 

Everyday Sexism: A Panel Discussion

Thursday, March 25, 2021

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity and the Sexual Violence Advocacy and Support Center

Participants joined for a conversation about the pervasiveness of everyday sexism women experience in different spaces and how we can support women's experiences and activism to challenge the dominant narratives and expectations associated with gender and equality. Participants discussed ways to empower and dismantle the silent expectations of social norms imposed on women.

Panelists: Dr. Jamie Huff - Criminal Justice, Dr. Meghan Murphy - Sociology, and Dr. Luis Paredes - OID, and Christy Osborne, Outreach Coordinator as the moderator.

Contact: Luis Paredes, Director, Office of Institutional Diversity

 

Reflective Dialogue

Tuesday, March 23, 2021

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity

This event was open to all community members to learn about and discuss issues critical to cultural humility, equity, diversity, and inclusion. With this series, the Office of Institutional Diversity (OID) strives toward building more robust and organic relationships through increased understanding and trust, which ultimately nurtures an inclusive workplace. Bring your candor, your experiences, and your willingness to continue creating a welcoming BSU for all.

Contact: Luis Paredes, Director, Office of Institutional Diversity

 

Standing as Allies with the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Communities

Friday, March 19, 2021 | 12-1 p.m.

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity

One-hour conversation entitled “Standing as Allies with the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Communities” that allowed us to think together about how we can act as allies to the AAPI communities.  

Contact: Luis Paredes, Director, Office of Institutional Diversity

 

The Battle to Reveal Women’s HERstory

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Sponsored by the Office of Institutional Diversity, Anthropology, Women’s and Gender Studies, and Global Languages and Literatures

Why women's history month? What is gender mainstreaming? What are the contributions of feminisms to academia? This panel will explore the different approaches and experiences women embark on to survive social norms' expectations. Our panel's goal is to share how women's role in society informs the work logic and the worlds/spaces around them and us. Join us for a discussion to amplify various perspectives of how women's herstories have impacted or informed pedagogical approaches, cultural changes, and inclusive practices over time.

Panelists: Dr. Diana Fox - Anthropology, Dr. Alba Aragón - Global Languages and Literatures, Dr. Erin O'Connor - Women's and Gender Studies, and Dr. Luis Paredes, moderator.

Contact: Luis Paredes, Director, Office of Institutional Diversity

 

Broadening Access and Equity in Undergraduate Research at BSU

Thursday, March 11, 2021 | 3-5 p.m.

Sponsored by the Division of Academic Affairs

Curriculum-Based Approaches to Authentic “Research-like” Experiences

Workshop 2 in the Bartlett College of Science and Mathematics (BCoSM) series. One opportunity to broaden our students’ access to scholarly inquiry is to build authentic “research-like” experiences into our normal curricula. “Research-like classroom experiences” may include Project- and Problem-Based Learning (PBL), creative scholarship, service learning, international collaborations, research-based inquiry learning, and other student-centered inquiry experiences. In this workshop, we discussed how hands-on experience, critical thinking skills, and professional mentorship can be scaffolded throughout undergraduate coursework. Faculty reflected on their own courses and shared ideas for incorporating real-world problems and faculty-led scholarship into a variety of classrooms. 

Facilitators: Dr. Ed Brush (Chemical Sciences), Dr. Alyssa Deline (Chemical Sciences), Dr. Saritha Nellutla (Chemical Sciences), and Kacey O’Donnell (Undergraduate Research)

 

BSU Faculty Roundtable Discussion: Capitol Insurrection & Impeachment

Tuesday, March 2, 2021 | 3-4:30 p.m.

Sponsored by the Division of Academic Affairs

Participants joined us for an interdisciplinary roundtable discussion on the events and aftermath of the attack at the U.S. Capitol and the impeachment and acquittal of former President Trump.  Bridgewater State University faculty with diverse disciplinary perspectives discussed the ideologies and rhetoric that led up to the violence in our nation’s capital on January 6, as well as the widespread implications of the insurrection and the ongoing threats. 

Discussants: Dr. Jackie Boivin (Elementary & Early Childhood Education), Dr. Diana Fox (Anthropology), Dr. Brian Frederick (Political Science), Dr. Mark Kemper (Political Science), Dr. Maggie Lowe (History), Dr. Kevin McGowan (Elementary & Early Childhood Education), Dr. Thomas Nester (History), Dr. Mia Ortiz (Criminal Justice), and Dr. Ian Saxine (History)

 

Expressing Solidarity with Asian Americans as they Encounter Violence and Hate Crimes

Tuesday, March 2, 2021 | 12-1 p.m.

Sponsored by the Division of Academic Affairs

In response to regional and national intolerance, bigotry, and acts of violence, the Bridgewater State University community has always come together to reaffirm its own values of social justice, diversity, inclusion and equality for all. This virtual assembly protested the recent violence and hate crime against Asian Americans and Asian immigrants.

Contact: Jabbar Al-Obiadi

 

American Studies & African American Studies Guest Lecture

Monday, March 1, 2021 | 2-3 p.m.

Sponsored by the Division of Academic Affairs

Dr. Karen Woods Weierman, Professor of English at Worcester State University, delivered a talk based on her latest book, The Case of the Slave-Child, Med: Free Soil in Antislavery Boston. Dr. Weierman broadened her remarks to include the lessons and legacy of the 1836 case of 6-year-old Med for the fraught social relations in the U.S. today.
 

 

For more past events, see Exhibit M, page 404 of the Presidential Task Force on Racial Justice Final Report.