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Educator's Guide and Resources

Welcome to The Massachusetts Chronicles Educator’s Guide! We hope that this resource empowers you to use the timeline and news articles to provide students with a rich interdisciplinary learning experience at any grade level.

Classroom Activities

The guide is organized into seven themes informed by the National Council for the Social Studies’ Curriculum Standards for Social Studies and encourages students to explore Massachusetts through a variety of contextual lenses:

  1. Behold, the Timeline! (chronological reasoning)
  2. Becoming Massachusetts (culture and social institutions)
  3. Community, Civic Action, and the Commonwealth (rights and responsibilities)
  4. “From Stockbridge to Boston” and Beyond! (geography and place)
  5. Industry & Innovation (economics, technology, environmental interaction)
  6. Big Time Bay Staters (individuals and biography)
  7. Our Commonwealth Today and Tomorrow (contemporary issues)

Each theme features a series of suggested tasks for teachers to engage students in learning about Massachusetts history. Themes 1 through 6 are organized by grade span (K-5, 6-12), and Theme 7 is organized more broadly to encourage students across the K-12 spectrum to consider their place in our Commonwealth today. We have also identified areas for interdisciplinary learning in ELA, Math, Science, and the Arts.

The tasks are all tagged with relevant content and practice standards from the 2018 Massachusetts History & Social Science Framework to help teachers integrate these learning experiences into existing units of learning.

Teachers will note that many of these tasks serve as a launching point to extend learning beyond the timeline and news articles. Using The Massachusetts Chronicles as an anchor text, we strongly encourage teachers to conduct background research and explore the context of the various topics before engaging in these tasks to ensure that students are exposed to sources and information that address the various aspects of a particular topic in an inclusive manner.

We are so excited to provide you with this resource and we thank you in advance for providing your students with a rich and meaningful state and local history learning experience!

Additional class sets and timelines are available to educators at a 50% discount

Purchase Additional Class Sets/Timelines

How to Use this Guide

All the learning activities in this guide have been aligned to the 2018 Massachusetts History & Social Science Framework. Learning activities are aligned to content standards and/or one of the seven History & Social Science Practice Standards.

Content standards are coded by grade/course (K., 1., US I., etc.) and topic or subtopic. Practice Standards are coded using the prefix PS.

In addition to History & Social Science standards, various learning activities also feature connections to other subject areas. Those activities are marked with the following icons:

English/Language Arts

Arts

Math

Science, Technology, and Engineering

MA Chronicles Activity
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    A “Ripple” in Time
    Identify which events from The Massachusetts Chronicles timeline had ripple effects throughout the nation and/or the world. Find corresponding news articles from various perspectives (local, national, global) to make connections and note disparities between the way the event is presented in this account and in the articles found. Assist students in evaluating underrepresentation and/or the notion that no historical event happens in isolation. We recommend that teachers do background research ahead of time to be prepared to assist students with this task.
    6-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5)
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    How Did We Get Here?
    Assign or have students select an important event on the timeline (tip: select items on the last half or third of the timeline). Using the articles in The Massachusetts Chronicles and the events on the timeline, have them select six items that trace a story, culminating in the final important event. Probe student thinking: Is there more to the story? A backstory? Can students “read between the lines” of the historical context?
    6-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.6)
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    Music to My Ears
    Research musical styles of the different eras reflected on the timeline. Have students assign songs or build a playlist. Discuss what aspect of the music changed over time? What stayed the same over time? How did the historical events taking place affect the musical styles? How did the musical styles affect the historical events?
    6-12
    Art
    (PS.3, PS.4; Arts)
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    What Did We Miss?
    Explore the timeline, research Bay State history, and identify a major event in Massachusetts history that is not included in The Massachusetts Chronicles timeline. Make a case for why it should be included (or excluded), especially in the context of the events that are currently represented.
    6-12
    English/Language Arts
    (PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6; ELA)
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    Connect 4
    Have students select four moments on the timeline that connect in some way. It is up to the students to determine this connection, and make a case for how they connect. Have them create a graphic organizer, such as a Venn diagram or web of some sort, to show how the moments connect. Teachers could scaffold this activity with the themes from the timeline.
    K-5
    (PS.3)
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    Count It Out
    Use mathematical calculations that result in four-digit answers to direct students to key dates on the timeline related to important events in a scavenger hunt fashion.
    K-5
    Math
    (Math)
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    Make That Tune!
    Provide students with a representative span of decades to choose from on the timeline and research what type of music people listened to during that era, including the roots of this music, which often trace back to Africa and Native Peoples. Write a song about the events of that time period in the same style of popular music at the time.
    K-5
    Art
    (PS.3, PS.4; Arts)
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    Make the Case!
    Assign time periods or eras from the timeline to students and have them further research the time period and write a persuasive essay that explains why that era was the most significant in the story of our Commonwealth.
    K-5
    English/Language Arts
    (PS.3, PS.6; ELA)
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    Mixed-Up Massachusetts
    Using the blank timeline template and card set, have students sort the series of events and place them on the timeline using only the contextual clues on the template (world and U.S. events listed alongside the Massachusetts events). Have students check how close they were to the actual sequence. Then have students take part in a discussion and explain their reasoning for the placements as a way to engage students in chronological reasoning and the historical skill of causation (see the HSS Practice Standards for more support).
    K-5
    (PS.3)
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    The Big Six
    Select six articles from The Massachusetts Chronicles or events from the timeline and set aside a time, such as every Friday or every other day, to read each one aloud to the class. After each article is read aloud, students should create an illustration of the event (with a descriptive sentence or two, where able). Once all six articles have been read, engage in a class discussion and ask the students to arrange their illustrations and descriptions of the six events in order, forming their own mini timelines. Students can share their timeline with a partner or in small groups before sharing with the whole class, thus practicing sequencing.
    K-5
    English/Language Arts, Art
    (PS.3, K.T3.3; ELA, Arts)
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    Time Capsule
    After exploring some key Massachusetts history events and figures, gather artifacts, objects, and symbols representing Massachusetts and place them in a time capsule. Imagine this time capsule will be opened in 200 years and you want future Bay Staters to know our history. Be sure to “make the case” for each object as space will be limited. Teachers should work with students to ensure that these time capsules and their items represent an inclusive approach (including people/groups who may have been traditionally excluded) to Massachusetts today.
    K-5
    English/Language Arts
    (1.T3.2; ELA)
  • Unit 1: Behold! The Timeline!
    “Living” Timeline
    Create an intergenerational timeline using events from three different generations (grandparent/senior, parent/adult, and events from your own life). Include three important or significant events that happened during each person’s lifetime and plot on a timeline. (Be sure to emphasize that if the student does not have access to information about other generations in their families, they can interview neighbors, friends, or consider community resources like nursing homes.) Find and add at least one event on the timeline that connects or adds value to your intergenerational time. Then have students construct a personal narrative that explains how the intergenerational timeline explains who they are today.
    K-5
    English/Language Arts
    (1. T3.1, 2.T3.3; ELA)
  • Unit 2: Becoming Massachusetts
    All Sides of the Story
    Choosing an event from the news articles, have students conduct deeper research and rewrite the article for that story from a different perspective (loyalist instead of colonist, Native Peoples instead of colonists, etc.). Then have students discuss the value of seeing history from a variety of perspectives by comparing and contrasting the different viewpoints.
    6-12
    English/Language Arts
    (PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6; ELA)
  • Unit 2: Becoming Massachusetts
    Fifty Years Later
    Using the speech by Wamsutta Frank James (see p. 28), have students analyze his central argument and reasoning and assess how his argument relates to the last 50 years of Massachusetts history and how we should receive his message today. Point out to students that, while James’s words were dismissed as wrong or mistaken at the time, and was subjected to censorship by asking him to emphasize the Thanksgiving myth. Has anything changed? What work remains as we commemorate the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrims’ arrival and beyond?
    6-12
    English/Language Arts
    (PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, 8.T4.12, USII.T4.8f, US II.T4.9; ELA)
  • Unit 2: Becoming Massachusetts
    Knowing Our Neighbors
    Using the timeline as a starting point, have students research a diverse group beyond their own community and conduct interviews with leaders and members of that community to create a presentation about how that group has shaped the students’ local community both in the past and today.
    6-12
    English/Language Arts
    (PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6; ELA)
  • Unit 2: Becoming Massachusetts
    Out of Many
    Using all the articles and the timeline, have students compile a list of all the racial and ethnic groups identified. Using other resources, have them research additional groups that came to call Massachusetts home. Then have individual students or small teams research a recipe for a traditional dish for a chosen group from the list. At a designated time, have the students prepare and bring samples of the dish they prepared and share with the class how their dish has influenced Massachusetts.
    6-12
    (PS.3)
  • Unit 2: Becoming Massachusetts
    People and Places
    Using census and other historical data such as the Earle Report, have students research how the demographics of Massachusetts have changed over time. Have students consider the history of mis/underrepresentation of people of color in Massachusetts and what impact this has had on all communities.
    6-12
    Math
    (PS.3, PS.5; Math)
  • Unit 2: Becoming Massachusetts
    Represent
    Following a discussion of the ways in which culture and identity are interconnected, have students select an article that they feel best represents the ways Bay Staters today identify themselves. In a paragraph, describe why they chose that article and how it relates to Massachusetts today.
    6-12
    English/Language Arts
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5; ELA)
  • Unit 2: Becoming Massachusetts
    Strength and Diversity
    Have students choose a diverse group from our history and conduct research beyond the timeline events and stories about that group in The Massachusetts Chronicles to create a presentation on how that group represents strength and diversity.
    6-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6)
  • Unit 2: Becoming Massachusetts
    A Flag for the Future
    Many people in Massachusetts today believe that it’s time for us to update our state flag. Using their knowledge of the many different people and voices of Massachusetts, have students redesign the state flag in a manner that represents the diversity of our state.
    K-5
    Art
    (PS.7, 1. T3.2, 3.T1.2; Arts)
  • Unit 2: Becoming Massachusetts
    Massachusetts Mosaic
    After an intentional reading of the timeline with a focus on the different types of people who have shaped our state history, have students create a collage or mural with images that represent the cultures and people of Massachusetts both then and now.
    K-5
    Art
    (1.T3.1, 2.T3.1, 2.T3.3, 2.T3.4, 3.T1.2; Arts)
  • Unit 2: Becoming Massachusetts
    My Family and Massachusetts
    Using their own family history (or that of other adults in their lives), have students create a timeline that explains the history of how their family came to the land known as Massachusetts.
    K-5
    (1.T3.1, 2.T3.3, 3.T1.2)
  • Unit 2: Becoming Massachusetts
    Spotlight On...
    Explain to students that history books don’t always represent many different viewpoints or storylines. Challenge students to choose a group of people in Massachusetts history (women, Native Peoples, African-Americans, etc.) and create a new annotated history of this group in particular. It is important for students to understand that these histories are an integral part of Massachusetts and U.S. history and should not be treated as something separate.
    K-5
    (PS.3, PS.4, PS.5)
  • Unit 3: Community, Civic Action, and the Commonwealth
    Doctrine of Discovery
     In the 1823 Supreme Court decision Johnson v. M’Intosh, the Court declared that the doctrine of discovery—the notion that whoever finds a land through colonization can claim it—can be applied to Native Peoples’ territories. Have students research the broader issue of land rights in Native Peoples history and explain how these issues relate to the concepts of rights and responsibilities.
    6-12
    (USI.T2.2, USI.T2.3)
  • Unit 3: Community, Civic Action, and the Commonwealth
    Good Citizenship
    Using the timeline, have students identify people/events that exemplify the following characteristics: fairness, caring, justice, and responsibility (see the MA History & Social Science Framework for more direction on defining these terms). Have students summarize how their assigned or chosen people/events model these characteristics. Teachers could specifically feature events and figures related to Native and black histories in Massachusetts.
    6-12
    English/Language Arts
    (K.T1.3, 1.T1.4; ELA)
  • Unit 3: Community, Civic Action, and the Commonwealth
    Taking Informed Action
    Using the timeline, have students assess the status of civil rights and personal liberties in Massachusetts since before 1600. Encourage students to identify the unfinished work of this timeline and develop a civic action plan that seeks to expand the rights/liberties of their chosen issue.
    6-12
    (PS.6, PS.7)
  • Unit 3: Community, Civic Action, and the Commonwealth
    The People Govern
    Using the timeline, have students explore ways in which “ordinary citizens” have made a difference in civic life in Massachusetts. What contributions did they make? How did they get to be in a position to make change? Are there any incredible citizens within their respective communities today who are doing this as well?
    6-12
    (PS.7)
  • Unit 3: Community, Civic Action, and the Commonwealth
    The Power of Protest
    Have students examine the timeline through the lens of protest/resistance, discuss the outcome of the actions, and determine whether the desired outcome was achieved. What could they have done if the action didn’t work? Next, have students research protest movements in recent Massachusetts history and today and compare these to the events/ actions of the timeline.
    6-12
    (8.T4.12, 8.T5.6a, USII.T4.5)
  • Unit 3: Community, Civic Action, and the Commonwealth
    The Power of the Ballot
    Using events on the timeline that emphasize self-governance, have students research recent/current state ballot initiatives and summarize the arguments for/against the questions. Then have students propose a new ballot question and develop a rationale for passing this question into law.
    6-12
    (PS.1, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.7)
  • Unit 3: Community, Civic Action, and the Commonwealth
    A Civil Body Politic
    Using the article on p.4 about the Mayflower Compact, have students create a compact for their classroom. What rules should everyone follow? Why is this compact important? How will such a compact help everyone learn? Compare this event to the article on p.6 from the Wampanoag reporter about the Pilgrims ignoring Wampanoag laws.
    K-5
    (3.T4.1a)
  • Unit 3: Community, Civic Action, and the Commonwealth
    Leading the Way
    Using the timeline, identify people in Massachusetts history who have been leaders in civic life. Discuss the qualities that made them good leaders and how we can learn from these leaders when it comes to community and civic engagement today.
    K-5
    (1.T1.3, 1.T1.4)
  • Unit 3: Community, Civic Action, and the Commonwealth
    Native Peoples and the Struggle for Land
    Have students read about the taking of Native lands by the colonists on p.6 and consider how this was a denial of their rights to lands they have lived on for thousands of years. Next, present students with other key events in this narrative through the centuries such as the Mashpee Revolt of 1833 and the current legal challenges of the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe today. Have students evaluate how Native Peoples have had to fight for their rights of land ownership.
    K-5
    (3.T5.2, 5.T4.5c)
  • Unit 3: Community, Civic Action, and the Commonwealth
    We Have Rights
    After facilitating a conversation about defining rights, find an event on the timeline where a right or rights were fought for and gained and research how earning that right has impacted our history since then. Why would they have to be fought for? Who are the people/ groups who have benefited from this civic action?
    K-5
    (PS.3, PS.4, PS. 5, PS.6, PS.7, 5.T5.8, 5. T5.9)
  • Unit 4: “From Stockbridge to Boston” and Beyond!
    Land Acknowledgement

    Land/Territorial Acknowledgements are a way to understand the history of Native Peoples and to bring attention to indigenous peoples both in the past and today. Have your students research the Native Peoples to whom your city/town’s land belongs and its history (native names, treaties/events, etc.). Then invite members of this Native Peoples community to meet with your students and discuss these issues. Have students prepare a Land Acknowledgement presentation based on what they’ve learned.
    A few important considerations: Some Native groups no longer exist due to the colonial process. Teachers should prepare to gain a broader understanding of Native history of the area in order to teach this appropriately. Teachers should not justify colonial actions that hurt or diminish Native Peoples and cultures. Teachers should be aware that much of Massachusetts’ Native history has thus far been omitted from textbooks, which means they will need to rely on other sources to understand this history.

    6-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.6, PS.7)
  • Unit 4: “From Stockbridge to Boston” and Beyond!
    Push & Pull
     Using articles on p. 4 and 7 as a starting point, have students research and then compare the push & pull factors of migration for 2-3 different groups in Massachusetts history. Students should consider economic, social, and political influences on migration.
    6-12
    (USI.T3.2c, USI.T6.4, US II.T2.1d)
  • Unit 4: “From Stockbridge to Boston” and Beyond!
    Shifting Lines
    Using a GIF editor, have students create an animated image of the changing political border of Massachusetts, from the original territories of Native Peoples pre-1600 to present. After creating and viewing the image, have students discuss the impact of these changes on the people who have lived in Massachusetts in the past and those who live here today, particularly analyzing the process of Native territories becoming Massachusetts.
    6-12
    (PS.3, PS.6)
  • Unit 4: “From Stockbridge to Boston” and Beyond!
    All About Massachusetts
    Using the historical and geographical information contained in The Massachusetts Chronicles, have students create an ABC’s book called “All About Massachusetts” that connects each letter of the alphabet to an important aspect of Massachusetts. Note: students should not use “I” for “Indian.”
    K-5
    English/Language Arts, Art
    (ELA, Arts)
  • Unit 4: “From Stockbridge to Boston” and Beyond!
    Changing Landscapes
    Have students choose a particular location in their community that is well-recognized. Research and compare/contrast how that landscape/location has changed over time from the early days of Native Peoples through the 20th century. For example, have students research ancient ways within their community and how they became roads today, or find trail ways within our woods today and explore how those trails came to be established.
    K-5
    (2.T2.4, 2.T5, 3.T1.1)
  • Unit 4: “From Stockbridge to Boston” and Beyond!
    Road Trip!
    Using the Places to Visit section on the back of the timeline, have students identify five places to visit, and plan a trip to those five places including the combined mileage and the budget for fuel needed for their family car. Have them write why they chose each site and how the environment played a role in that site’s existence.
    K-5
    English/Language Arts, Math
    (3.T1.1, 4.T4a; ELA, Math)
  • Unit 4: “From Stockbridge to Boston” and Beyond!
    Visit Massachusetts
    Using the timeline, Massachusetts map, Places to Visit section, and outside research, have students construct an infographic describing a selected region of Massachusetts as an advertisement to get others to visit that region.
    K-5
    English/Language Arts, Art
    (3.T1.1, 4.T4a; ELA, Arts)
  • Unit 5: Industry & Innovation
    In Their Footprints
    Have students in small groups create a flowchart or other visual to illustrate the long-term impacts of Massachusetts scientists and inventors featured in the articles. The chart or visual should feature the historic contribution and show how the discovery or innovation continues to affect lives today. Students may also want to do additional research beyond those featured in the timeline.
    6-12
    Science, Technology, and Engineering
    (PS.3, PS.6; Sci)
  • Unit 5: Industry & Innovation
    Labor Movements
    Have students take a deeper dive into one of the examples from Massachusetts history of the labor movement’s fight for fair wages and conditions (the Lowell Mill Girls, the Bread and Roses Strike, etc.) and identify what conditions the workers were fighting, what they demanded, and what they accomplished. Then have students research a modern labor issue and compare/contrast the issues of that example with the historical examples.
    6-12
    (PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6, USI.T3.2e, USII.T2.1j)
  • Unit 5: Industry & Innovation
    Sailing to Freedom
    Using the article about Paul Cuffee on p. 16 as a launching point, have students research the history of abolition in the whaling industry and the contributions of both free blacks and runaway slaves in this key 19th-century industry. Students and teachers should review the resources of the New Bedford Historical Society for more information.
    6-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.6, USI.T3.13, USI.T3.14, USI.T3.15)
  • Unit 5: Industry & Innovation
    Slavery in Massachusetts
    Though the Massachusetts Supreme Court ruled slavery unconstitutional in the Commonwealth in 1783, the reality is that Massachusetts industry benefited from slave labor to that point. Have students conduct research on the history of slavery in Massachusetts and consider why this history is often overlooked and why it is important to acknowledge. In particular, teachers and students should look at resources from the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Royall House and Slave Quarters for more information.
    6-12
    (PS.1, PS.2, PS.3, PS.6, USI.T3.13, USI.T3.14)
  • Unit 5: Industry & Innovation
    The Massachusetts Economy
    Have students timeline the various industries of Massachusetts over time. Then have students analyze how those industries have endured, adapted, or diminished. Next, have students consider what factors cause this change over time and what that means for both the environment and the future of the Commonwealth.
    6-12
    Science, Technology, and Engineering
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.6; Sci)
  • Unit 5: Industry & Innovation
    What is Property?
    Have students take a deeper dive into Native Peoples’ worldview about their relationship with the land and compare/contrast those views with the views of William Bradford regarding private property ownership on p.6. Then have students make a connection between the contrasting viewpoints on land ownership and the ongoing conflict caused by the encroachment of colonists on Native Peoples from 1620 to 1676 and to the present day.
    6-12
    (PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6)
  • Unit 5: Industry & Innovation
    Don’t Delay! Buy Today!
    Using an invention or technological breakthrough discovered in Massachusetts, have students create an infomercial selling that technology or innovation to the general public, complete with a demonstration of the technology, client testimonials, and a pitch about how this will change life as we know it. Next, have students critique this invention or breakthrough: Are there downsides to this, particularly from an environmental perspective? How should this be addressed?
    K-5
    (1.T4.5, 1.T4.8, 2.T2.4)
  • Unit 5: Industry & Innovation
    Made in Massachusetts
    Have students identify key products and exports of Massachusetts from the various industries of our state both historically and today, identifying which ones are goods (cranberries, fish, etc.) versus services (shipping, tourism, etc.) and the people involved in producing/ providing both. How did this industry begin and develop, and what is its environmental impact? Then have students design and play out a Massachusetts shop where students buy and sell these goods/services.
    K-5
    (2.T5.1, 3.T5.5, 4.T4a.4)
  • Unit 5: Industry & Innovation
    Native Peoples and Resources
    Using the article on pp.1–2 as an anchor, direct students to explore how Native Peoples such as the Wampanoag worked together to provide for their community through farming, fishing, hunting, gathering, and the production of tools, clothing, heirlooms, and other material items. Have students create a museum exhibit that informs their fellow students about these communal aspects of indigenous culture and makes an explicit connection to how this culture and philosophy relates to our industry and economic activity today.
    K-5
    (2.T2.4, 3.T2.3)
  • Unit 5: Industry & Innovation
    That’s Phenomenal!
    Using the Massachusetts Science and Technology Practice Standards, have students investigate a phenomenon that one would investigate while developing one of the innovations outlined in this timeline, including scientific and technological phenomena of the Native Peoples and their industries pre-1600. Students can assume the role of that scientist and generate a series of questions that they would ask to try and explain that phenomenon. Then have students engage in a deeper study of the actual history to understand how that scientist made their discovery.
    K-5
    Science, Technology, and Engineering
    (PS.2, PS.3; Sci)
  • Unit 5: Industry & Innovation
    Working Around Town
    Using examples of industry from the timeline, have students conduct research on the history of industries and the economy of their local community (Native industry, textiles, shipping, etc.) and create a presentation that explains how landmarks in your town today relate to the industries of the past.
    K-5
    (K.T4.1, 1.T4.1, 2.T5.1, 3.T1.1)
  • Unit 6: Big Time Bay Staters
    Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner
    Have each student select an event or person from the timeline. Using any related articles in The Massachusetts Chronicles, books, or digital resources, have them research this person or event. With the information they have gathered, have students form smaller groups (4–6) and instruct that they are attending a dinner party together, even though their extraordinary Bay Staters lived in different time periods. Have them stay in character as they engage in discussion about their views on different subjects or events happening around them.
    6-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6)
  • Unit 6: Big Time Bay Staters
    In Their Own Words
    Gather primary source quotes from key people featured throughout the timeline, making sure that there is a wide range of people represented. Challenge students to match a quote to an extraordinary Bay Stater featured in the articles that best reflects the individual’s historic contributions. These could be displayed as memes. Students should explain their selection in 2–3 sentences.
    6-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6)
  • Unit 6: Big Time Bay Staters
    Massachusetts Tournament
    Using the Massachusetts Honor Roll section, create a tournament bracket of these important people and conduct a discussion as a class about who they believe should be named the most significant Bay Stater in history and support their claims with reasoning and evidence. For each match-up, have students vote on who should advance in the tournament. Continue the tournament until a winner is chosen. Have students also consider the larger field beyond the winner and what their accomplishments say about our history.
    6-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6)
  • Unit 6: Big Time Bay Staters
    Who Did We Miss?
    The Massachusetts History and Social Science Framework Guiding Principles states that “An effective history and social science education incorporates diverse perspectives and acknowledges that perceptions of events are affected by race, ethnicity, culture, religion, education, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability, and personal experience” (2018, p. 13). With this guiding principle in mind, have students review the Massachusetts Honor Roll section through an inclusiveness lens. Challenge students to present nominations for including other important Bay Staters in the spirit of this Guiding Principle for inclusion in a future edition of the resource.
    6-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6, PS.7)
  • Unit 6: Big Time Bay Staters
    Bay Staters Who Shine
    Students can choose one of the many biographical articles, such as Frederick Douglass on p.19 and summarize the text. Teachers should ensure that a wide range of people and figures are represented, including Native Peoples and black people. Then they should identify what they think is the most important thing this Bay Stater accomplished and at least two characteristics they believe this person had that made him/her successful. Students can then do one of the following activities: create a Massachusetts People Board for the class highlighting these extraordinary Bay Staters in history by category or chronology; or create a book cover or movie poster advertising the Massachusetts person, their most important accomplishment, and their most prominent character trait, and how their accomplishments have made Massachusetts a better place.
    K-5
    English/Language Arts
    (PS.3, PS.6, 1. T1.4, 1.T1.7, 3.T1.2; ELA)
  • Unit 6: Big Time Bay Staters
    Extraordinary Bay Staters
    Have each student select an event or person from the timeline. Using any related articles in The Massachusetts Chronicles, books, or digital resources, have them research this person or event. With the information they have gathered, have them prepare for one of the following activities. Human Timeline: Form a human timeline by having students present their research either in a living history format where students become the character or act out the event. Gallery Walk: Have students create visual posters advertising or describing the person or event they researched.
    K-5
    English/Language Arts
    (PS.3, PS.6, 1.T1.4, 1.T1.7, 3.T1.2; ELA)
  • Unit 7: Our Commonwealth Today and Tomorrow
    Codcasting
    Have students research a contemporary issue related to the themes of the timeline and develop a podcast episode that explains the contemporary issue, how it relates to the history of Massachusetts, and includes expert interviews/ commentary.
    K-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6, PS.7)
  • Unit 7: Our Commonwealth Today and Tomorrow
    Environmental Challenges
    Respect for and stewardship of our environment and natural resources relates to all the themes of this guide. Have students identify events/issues from the timeline that relate to the environment and climate to develop context for our challenges today. Then have students research the predicted impact of climate change on Massachusetts for the next 100 years. Have students create an awareness campaign that calls fellow Bay Staters to take action for the climate and environment of our commonwealth.
    K-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.5, PS.6, PS.7)
  • Unit 7: Our Commonwealth Today and Tomorrow
    Modern Native Peoples’ Issues
    Lead your students in researching a modern issue regarding Native Peoples in Massachusetts, such as the use of Native mascots, legal fights over tribal land recognition, etc. Encourage your students to reach out to officials from the two federally recognized tribes in Massachusetts (the Aquinnah Wampanoag and Mashpee Wampanoag) and/or the state-recognized Herring Pond tribe to gain additional insight and understanding about these complex issues.
    K-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6, PS.7)
  • Unit 7: Our Commonwealth Today and Tomorrow
    Our 400
    2020 marks the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the Pilgrims to the Wampanoag village of Patuxet. Have students research how this event has been commemorated in the past (1820, 1970, etc.). In small groups, have the students develop a plan for the 400th anniversary commemorations across the Commonwealth starting in 2020, complete with which activities will take place where and how these activities demonstrate that we are learning from our history today. Have students present their proposals to a group of teachers, librarians, or administrators, and Native Peoples to determine the winning proposal.
    K-12
    (PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6, PS.7)
  • Unit 7: Our Commonwealth Today and Tomorrow
    Predict
    What will Massachusetts look like in 2220, 200 years from now, in regard to the various categories color-coded on The Massachusetts Chronicles timeline (science, culture, sports, etc.), or through the lens of the themes in this educator guide, or from an environmental perspective? What event(s) might you plot on a timeline marking notable changes within one of more of these categories? Write and/or draw about your prediction(s) and share with your classmates. Sort the class predictions into the appropriate color-coded categories.
    K-12
    (PS.2, PS.6)
  • Unit 7: Our Commonwealth Today and Tomorrow
    Racism and the Struggle for Equality
    Using the article on p. 28 about the Boston busing crisis as a starting point, have students research the history of systemic racism in Massachusetts in the 20th century and analyze how this history relates to issues of racism and inequality today. Encourage students to evaluate how antiracist movements and policies can address and dismantle these persisting inequalities.
    K-12
    (PS.1, PS.2, PS.3, PS.4, PS.5, PS.6, PS.7, 8.T4.20, 8.T4.25, 8.T4.27, USII.T4.35)
  • Unit 7: Our Commonwealth Today and Tomorrow
    The Jobs of Tomorrow
    After exploring all the technology and industry entries on the timeline, have students ponder what the future holds for industry and innovation in Massachusetts for the next 50 to 100 years. Students can research emerging technologies at Massachusetts companies and universities and consider the impact and consequences of developing these technologies.
    K-12
    (PS.2, PS.3. PS.4, PS.6)

Student Videos

Now that you and your students have enjoyed learning about Massachusetts through the timeline and news articles, we invite you and your class to contribute to this project and be a part of the resource itself!

  1. Read through the video timeline project instructions.
  2. Visit the Massachusetts Chronicles video upload form.
  3. Complete the Video Submission Form with all requested information and upload the video and closed captioning script.
  4. After submitting the form, the Bridgewater State University Teaching & Technology Center (TTC) will review the submission and upload the video to The Massachusetts Chronicles YouTube Channel.
  5. The TTC will notify the submitter once the video is uploaded and ready for viewing.

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The Massachusetts Chronicles

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