Our Faculty - Anthropology

Our Faculty

Faculty Profiles

  • Diana Fox

    Diana Fox
    Professor and Chairperson of Anthropology; Editor, Journal of International Women's Studies
    Hart Hall, Room 239
    Tel:
    508.531.2847

    Diana Fox, is a cultural and applied anthropologist, scholar-activist, and documentary film producer. Her work focuses on the Anglophone Caribbean, particularly Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago where she researches issues of gender and sexual diversity, women’s social movement activism for ecological sustainability, women's human rights and transnational feminisms and activism. She serves on a number of boards and committees including the Sexualities Working Group of the Caribbean Studies Association (CSA), the international advisory board of the Fondes Amandes Community Reforestation Project (FACRP) in Trinidad and Tobago, and is the Founder and Editor of the open access, online Journal of International Women’s Studies. As a scholar-activist, Diana has researched issues of gender and sexual diversity, women’s social movement activism for ecological sustainability, women's human rights and transnational feminisms. Because she is especially interested in forging collaborations with the communities she studies, her educational and activist films were produced to serve their goals, while educating the wider public. Earth, Water, Woman: Community and Sustainability in Trinidad and Tobago and Many Loves, One Heart: Stories of Courage and Resilience each tell stories of people striving against odds to protect their livelihoods, well-being, and identities. Many Loves focuses on the burgeoning LGBTQ movement in Jamaica by highlighting courageous members of the community and their allies, who have committed their lives to the Jamaican struggle for LGBTQ rights. The film shows the movement’s struggles and achievements, particularly the hopefulness and resilience of its young activists, whose bravery and desire to live in the Jamaica they love, challenges the dominant narrative that most LGBTQ Jamaicans are trying to leave their island.  She is the recipient of four Fulbright awards and many other grants and has published a number of books and articles.

    Degrees

    BA, Oberlin College
    MA, University of Arizona
    PhD, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

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  • Louise Badiane

    Louise Badiane
    Associate Professor of Anthropology; Coordinator, African Studies Program
    Hart Hall, Room 237
    Tel:
    508.531.2166

    Dr. Badiane is a medical anthropologist with interests in applied medical anthropology, global health, sexual and reproductive health, African ethnomedicine, African immigrants health issues in the US and Europe. Current research projects include: Ethnomedical study of female Mankagne healers in Senegal, Guinea Bissau and Gambia; Applied Anthropological study to improve the health status of the villagers of Haer, Senegal; Ethnobotanical study of indigenous medicines among herbalists in Ziguinchor, Senegal; A Multi-sited critical analysis of African diasporic engagement in homeland health, US, Senegal and Ghana; Ethnographic Study of Senegalese hair-braiding in the U.S.A; Ethnographic study of rastafari youth in the city of Ziguinchor, Senegal.

    Degrees

    MA, PhD, University of Connecticut

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  • Navid Fozi-Abivard

    Navid Fozi-Abivard
    Assistant Professor of Anthropology
    Hart Hall, Room 241
    Tel:
    508.531.2654

    Dr. Navid Fozi is a cultural anthropologist whose research explores minorities, migration, and emergent forms of pluralism and nationalism in Iran and its diasporas.  Fozi has conducted fieldwork with and published on ethnoreligious minorities in Iran, including his book on the Zoroastrians entitled Reclaiming the Faravahar: Zoroastrian Survival in Contemporary Tehran (Leiden University Press, 2014), and on the Ahl-e Haqq community entitled “The Hallowed Summoning of Tradition” (Anthropological Quarterly, 2007). He has also published on contemporary Iranian politics, including “Governmentality and Crises of Representation, Knowledge and Power in the Islamic Republic of Iran” (Asian Politics & Policy 2015); and “‘Neo-Iranian Nationalism,’” (The Middle East Journal, 2016). Fozi’s current project is based on his 2014-2017 field research among Iranian asylum seekers in Turkey, conducted as a fellow of the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TÜBİTAK) at the Middle East Technical University of Ankara. Tentatively entitled “Diasporic Counterpublics: Multiplicities, Challenges, and Trajectories of Iranian Asylum Seekers in Turkey,” this project explores issues that range from Islamic Shiʿi Jurisprudence, citizenship rights, border crossing, and right of asylum, to transit processes, international politics, and transnational practices. Fozi has been awarded a Visiting Fellowship at Harvard Law School’s Islamic Studies Program (2017-2018), a Fulbright-US Scholarship based in University of Malaya for fieldwork with Iranian Diaspora in Kuala Lumpur (2014), a Postdoctoral Research Fellowship at the Middle East Institute of the National University of Singapore (2011-2014), and a Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad for fieldwork in Iran (2006-2007).

    Degrees

    BA, MA University of Texas at Dallas
    MA, University of Wisconsin at Madison
    PhD, Boston University

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  • Ellen Ingmanson

    Ellen Ingmanson
    Professor of Anthropology
    Hart Hall, Room 238
    Tel:
    508.531.2799

    As a biological anthropologist, Dr. Ingmanson's primary research focuses on questions regarding the evolution of intelligence and the nature and origins of cultural behavior. A particular emphasis of her work is the contribution of primate studies to understanding human behavioral patterns and what it means to be human.  Much of her research has been with the apes, including chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, orangutans and gibbons.  Travelling to central Africa, and most recently to Borneo, she has conducted observations of object manipulation, tool use, communication, social skills, behavioral variation, infant development, ecology, and nonhuman culture. With her expertise in ape behavior, she has worked with a multi-disciplinary group to assist captive facilities in providing the best care possible for their animals.  Dr. Ingmanson also works with many students on research in the “Bone Lab,” projects related to forensic anthropology and bioarchaeology, identifying bones, species, and pathology. In her courses, Dr. Ingmanson addresses a wide range of issues that often cross traditional boundaries between natural and social science perspectives.

    Degrees

    BA, University of Colorado
    MA, PhD, University of Oregon

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  • Simone Poliandri

    Simone Poliandri
    Associate Professor of Anthropology; Coordinator of American Studies
    Hart Hall, Room 240
    Tel:
    508.531.1846

    Dr. Poliandri is a cultural anthropologist specialized in Native American Studies. He holds a PhD from Brown University and is an elected member of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. He has conducted ethnographic fieldwork among the Mi’kmaw people of the Canadian Maritimes since 2000, working on issues of traditionalism, contemporary identity dynamics and, recently, Aboriginal nationhood and nation-building. His monograph First Nations, Identity, and Reserve Life: The Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia was published by the University of Nebraska Press in 2011. His second book, an edited collection on the recent developments of Native American nationalism and nation-building, was published in the SUNY Press “Tribal Worlds” series in 2016. Dr. Poliandri has publications in academic journals and edited volumes on several topics, including social science research methods, Mi’kmaw residential school experiences in the twentieth century, contemporary Aboriginal maritime harvesting, and Native American ethnohistory. He is an Editorial Board Member for the series “Ethnographie Americane” published at the University of Rome “La Sapienza,” Italy. He teaches introductory and upper level courses in the social sciences and Native American Studies. He also coordinates the American Studies program. Dr. Poliandri plays acoustic guitar and soccer, and goes sailing for recreation. He lives in Massachusetts with his wife and daughter.

    Degrees

    PhD, Brown University

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  • Michael Zimmerman

    Michael Zimmerman
    Assistant Professor of Anthropology
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.2982

    Michael Zimmerman is an archaeologist, with a PhD from the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University, and a member of the Archaeological Institute of America, American Schools of Oriental Research, Northeastern Anthropological Association, and the Eastern States Archaeological Federation. He also holds an MA in Classical Languages from the University of Florida. He has been involved in the past ten years in the analysis and publication of pottery, lamps and other ceramic material from the Joint Expeditions to Caesarea Maritima in Israel. His graduate work, centered on the analysis of Hellenistic and Roman period pottery from ‘Iraq al-Amir in Jordan, is to be published by the American Schools of Oriental Research. He has excavated at a number of archaeological sites, including Caesarea Maritima in Israel, the Petra Great Temple Project in Jordan, and the Middleboro Little League Site in Massachusetts, as he expanded into the field of North American archaeology. His other work and research interests include antiquities trafficking, cultural heritage law and public policy, pottery studies, the archaeology of the Near East, and the prehistoric archaeology of Northeastern America. He teaches introductory and upper level archaeology courses, Middle Eastern cultures, and myth and folklore courses. He plays board games and role-playing games for recreation, and lives in Rhode Island with his wife and 4-year old son.

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Emeriti Faculty Profiles

  • Sandra Faiman-Silva

    Sandra Faiman-Silva
    Professor Emerita of Anthropology
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799

    Dr. Faiman-Silva has taught at Bridgewater since 1985. As a cultural anthropology generalist, her favorite courses include Anthropology of Women, Gender, Folklore, Native North America and Latin America, and the Anthropology of Education. Her book Choctaws at the Crossroads: The Political Economy of Class and Culture in the Oklahoma Timber Region (U Nebraska 1997) was named in 1997 as a finalist for the C. Wright Mills Award by the Society for the Study of Social Problems. Her most recent book, "The Courage to Connect: Sexuality, Citizenship, and Community in Provincetown" (U Illinois 2004), analyzes the relationship between gays and straights in that resort community. Dr. Faiman-Silva has published articles on Indian gaming, youth and culture, and her Provincetown research in the American Indian Culture and Research Journal, Anthropology and Education Quarterly, and The Gay and Lesbian Review. She received Bridgewater State University's Jordan D. Fiore Prize in World Justice in 1997 and the Class of 1950 Distinguished Faculty Research Award in 2003 for this research. Dr. Faiman-Silva is a campus and community activist and serves as Grievance Officer and Secretary of the Bridgewater State University -Massachusetts State College Association (MSCA) Chapter, an NEA affiliate. She lives in Falmouth, Massachusetts, where she is active in the town's "No Place for Hate" campaign and in other peace and justice causes.

    Degrees

    BA, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
    MA, University of Minnesota
    PhD, Boston University

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  • Curtiss Hoffman

    Curtiss Hoffman
    Professor Emeritus of Anthropology
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Archaeology, mythology, culture and consciousness, global human issues and the indigenous peoples and cultures of North America and the Middle East. 

    Degrees

    BA, Brandeis University, 1967, Mediterranean Studies
    PhD, Yale University, 1974, Near Eastern Languages and Literatures

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Part-time Faculty Profiles

  • Andrew Armstrong

    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    East Asia (Japan and Korea) and Oceania.  
    Urban anthropology, public housing projects and low-income neighborhoods.  
    Inequality and social reproduction theory.  
    Performance theory, Japanese hip hop, and hip hop outside of the USA.  
    Japanese classical and folk music.

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  • Elise Brenner

    Elise Brenner
    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Anthropology of women, folklore, gender violence and anti-violence in global perspective, food and culture, culture contact, culture change and symbolic uses of material culture.

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  • Linnea Carlson

    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1779
    Areas of Expertise

    Medical anthropology, social and cultural construction of gender and sexuality, the social aspects of HIV/AIDS, the relationship between social inequality, health, and disease, and Caribbean and Latin American culture.

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  • William Collins

    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Linguistics, Language and culture, Near Eastern Archaeology, Vietnamese, Spanish, Japanese, German.

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  • Walter Harper

    Walter Harper
    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Anthropology of children and childhood; educational anthropology; medical anthropology (US public health issues); psychological anthropology; social inequality; urban anthropology; and visual anthropology (film studies focusing on US people of color).

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  • Joshua Irizarry

    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Anthropology of Religion; Globalization of Religious Ideas and Practices; Contemporary Zen Buddhism; Cultural Diversity; Anthropological Theory and Ethics; Japan and East Asia.

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  • Calvin Mires

    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Maritime archaeology, archaeology and archaeological science, cultural heritage studies, public outreach and engagement.

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  • Nancy Monroe

    Nancy Monroe
    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Bioarchaeology, Human Osteology, Forensic Anthropology and Osteology, and Human Medical Specimens: Salvage and Analysis. Folklore and mythology studies. Cultural Anthropology.

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  • Heather Myers

    Heather Myers
    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Cultural Anthropology; Folklore - zombies, tricksters; Cultural fears, Horror and film studies; transnational religious practices and diaspora, Pagan religions; the culture of gaming and online worlds; Media/visual anthropology; instructional/learning design and technology.

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  • Heidi Savery

    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Cultural Heritage Management, Community Integration Management, sustainable tourism development. Political economy of heritage tourism; collaborative and ethnographic archaeologies; public outreach and community development; specialization in the northeastern US and Anglophone Caribbean, particularly Jamaica.

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  • Michele Hayeur Smith

    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Anthropological archaeologist with research interests in gender, textiles, dress, adornment and material culture studies in the North Atlantic, and Arctic and Northeastern North America. Field work experience in Iceland, Greenland, the Faroe Island, Scotland, Denmark, Norway, Sweden and northeastern North America. 

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  • Frank Spaulding

    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Psychological Anthropology, Identity Politics, Theory, Urbanity, Middle East, South Asia.

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  • Lara Watkins

    Lara Watkins
    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226
    Tel:
    508.531.1799
    Areas of Expertise

    Applied anthropology, medical anthropology, public health, social determinants of health, chronic disease, ethnic relations, qualitative and quantitative methods, Southeast Asian communities in the United States.

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  • Yongmei Wu

    Part-Time Faculty
    Hart Hall, Room 226/ Tillinghast Hall, Room 337
    Tel:
    508.531.1799, 508.531.1279
    Areas of Expertise

    Gender studies, population aging, modern advertising, mass media and popular culture in East Asia. Specializes in Japanese Studies with a focus on Japan Anthropology.

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Staff Profiles